Consciously Curated: Professional Parenting for a Good Life and Love

Consciously Curated is a roundup of news and information from other sources across the web to keep you thinking good:
"Hold my hand," a photo by Sabine van Straaten on Unsplash
“Hold my hand,” a photo by Sabine van Straaten on Unsplash

The Upshot: The Jobs You’re Most Likely to Inherit From Your Mother and Father

“Children often pursue their parents’ jobs because of the breakfast-table effect: Family conversations influence them. They fuel interests or teach children what less commonly understood careers entail (probably one reason textile spinning and shoemaking are high on the list of jobs disproportionately passed on to children). In interviews, people who followed their parents’ career paths described it as speaking the same language.”

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Pieces Of Me: A (Selected) Autobiography of John Jioni Palmer

Photo by Carson Arias on Unsplash

I was five or six and recall being in a laundromat, but mom believes it was at a grocery store. The alleged transgression is forgotten by us both, but each remembers her towering over me index finger wagging demanding, “Who do you think you are?” I replied, “John Jioni Palmer.”

Four decades later I am still that boy, but also much more. I am a son, husband, father and eldest grandchild; storyteller, chef, leader and coach—to name a few. Each day I breathe, I endeavor to be my best at who I am, while also nurturing the desire to explore and develop new ways of being and doing.

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Consciously Curated: Revolutionary Thumbs, Jocks, Pops & Scribes

“Once Removed” Photo by Alice Donovan Rouse – Courtesy of Unsplash
Here is a roundup of news and information from other sources across the web to help you keep thinking good:

New Yorker: The Revolution Will Not Be Tweeted

The world, we are told, is in the midst of a revolution. The new tools of social media have reinvented social activism. With Facebook and Twitter and the like, the traditional relationship between political authority and popular will has been upended, making it easier for the powerless to collaborate, coördinate, and give voice to their concerns. 

The platforms of social media are built around weak ties. Twitter is a way of following (or being followed by) people you may never have met. Facebook is a tool for efficiently managing your acquaintances, for keeping up with the people you would not otherwise be able to stay in touch with. That’s why you can have a thousand “friends” on Facebook, as you never could in real life.

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The Power of Doing the Ordinary: What We Learn at the Intersection of Politics, Sports, Race and Money

NCAA College Basketball second half game action during the college basketball game between the USC Trojans vs UCLA Bruins at Pauley Pavilion, Westwood, CA. (Photo by Jevone Moore/Full Image 360)

Every year during March Madness, I think about an article I wrote as a 19-year-old sophomore at UCLA examining the role of race and politics in college sports.

Over the past couple of years, the article has been forefront in my mind as the debate over paying college athletes has grown.  Additionally, there is the controversy provoked by professional athletes like Colin Kaepernick whose decision to observe “The Star-Spangled Banner” in protest of the highly-publicized spate of police killings of unarmed Black people; Quarterback Tom Brady’s boycott of former President Obama; and the current boycott of President Trump being organized by New England Patriot players Devin McCourty and Martellus Bennett.

Politics and sports have long held a close association, so much so that it is beyond laughable when commentators—professional or otherwise—suggest athletes ought to keep their opinions to themselves.

December 24, 2016 Los Angeles, CA.
NFL San Francisco vs Los Angeles Rams at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, Ca on December 24, 2016. (Photo by Jevone Moore/Full Image 360)

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Suite Talk: 4 Wise Wealth Tips for Your Wallet,  Part 5 – Build up your Liquid Savings

Photo by Olu EletuCourtesy of Unsplash

In our final interview with Wilson Lea exploring his article 4 Wise Wealth Tips for Your Wallet, we focus on why it is essential for you to have liquid savings to weather whatever life may throw your way.

“Traditional financial planning says that you should have 3 to 6 months of living expenses … In a perfect world this is true,” Lea says. “Admittedly, this can be difficult to do. You should always have some savings, but while you’re working on the other steps, $1000 should be enough cushion to get you over most things that could come up.”

Listen to learn more!

In case you missed our earlier chats with Wilson stemming from his article 4 Wise Wealth Tips for Your Wallet you can find them here:

Part 1: The Importance of Wealth Management
Part 2: Save for Retirement
Part 3: Pay Down your Debt
Part 4: Budget

As always, join the conversation by letting us know what are your topic financial goals.

Lean in, lean back and enjoy!

Share what you’re thinking, leave a comment. Stay connected with the Thinking Good community.

Suite Talk: 4 Wise Wealth Tips for Your Wallet,  Part 4 – Budget

Photo by Olu Eletu

Here’s Part 4 of our conversation with Wilson Lea of Parallax Advisor taking a deep dive into the subjects covered in his article, 4 Wise Wealth Tips for Your Wallet. In this episode, we talk about the importance of creating a budget.

“This is the hardest one for most people,” Lea says of understanding how folks spend and on what. But, he says, “tracking your expenses will help you understand where your money is going and how it is used. Budgets also help you avoid spending unnecessarily.”

Listen to learn more! Here you can find out Wilson’s advice on saving for retirement and eliminating debt. Next week we’ll talk with Wilson about developing strategies to build and maintain a liquid savings.

As always, join the conversation by letting us know what are your topic financial goals.

Lean in, lean back and enjoy!

Share what you’re thinking, leave a comment. Stay connected with the Thinking Good community.

Suite Talk: 4 Wise Wealth Tips for Your Wallet,  Part 3 – Pay Down Your Debt

Photo by Jim Filipovski

In the third installment of Suite Talk‘s interview with Wilson Lea, based on his article 4 Wise Wealth Tips for Your Wallet, we examine strategies for reducing debt (step one—don’t accumulate any more).

“What I suggest is that you start with the smallest balance credit card and make bigger payments on that card and make the minimum payments on other cards,” says Lea of Parallax Advisors, a boutique wealth management firm based in Irvine, CA. “As you pay off the smaller cards take those payments and move them up with the payments on the next biggest balance.”

With over two decades of expertise, Wilson has a proven track record of helping businesses, executives, retirees and families meet their financial goals.

Listen to learn more! In case you missed earlier portions of our conversation, you can find them here and here. Next week we’ll be talking about creating a budget to better help you achieve your wealth aspirations.

You can also join the conversation by letting us know what are your topic financial goals.

Lean in, lean back and enjoy!

Share what you’re thinking, leave a comment. Stay connected with the Thinking Good community.

Suite Talk: 4 Wise Wealth Tips for Your Wallet,  Part 2  – Save for Retirement

Wilson Lea of Parallax Advisors

Here’s Part 2 of the Suite Talk‘s interview with Wilson Lea of Parallax Advisor exploring his article 4 Wise Wealth Tips for Your Wallet.

In this segment of our chat we focus on saving for retirement.

“This is a must, must, must,” says Lea, a wealth managment advisor with over two decades of experience in finance. “If you are working full time, you HAVE to save your money … Zero percent is not an option. Pay yourself first.”

Listen to learn more!

You can also join the conversation by letting us know what are your topic financial goals.

Lean in, lean back and enjoy!

Share what you’re thinking, leave a comment. Stay connected with the Thinking Good community.

Suite Talk: Interview with Wilson Lea 4 Wise Wealth Tips for Your Wallet, Part 1

Photo by Vitaly

In this episode of the Suite Talk podcast we take a deep, but accessible, dive with Wilson Lea of Parallax Advisor and explore his article 4 Wise Wealth Tips for Your Wallet.

Brought to you in several parts (look for a new installment every Wednesday in January & early February) we break the conversation in to bite size chunks to help you focus on the key elements of getting your finances in order and setting you on a path to wealth accumulation.

Here we introduce the topic in a way that demystifies wealth and money management before methodically dissecting each of Wilson’s 4 Wise Wealth Tips for Your Wallet: Save for Retirement; Pay Down Your Debt; Budget and Build Up Your Liquid Savings.

Join the conversation by letting us know what are your topic financial goals.

Be on the lookout for subsequent parts of our conversation with Wilson each Wednesday for the next few weeks, and chats on other wealth related topics in the months beyond. But for now, lean in, lean back and enjoy!

Share what you’re thinking, leave a comment. Stay connected with the Thinking Good community.

Consciously Curated: Dying Alone, What Parents Read, Careless Whispers, Coming Back and Funky Grandma

Photo by Pedro Lastra

Here is a roundup of news and information from other sources across the web to help you keep thinking good:

NY Times: Social Isolation is Killing Us

Social isolation is a growing epidemic — one that’s increasingly recognized as having dire physical, mental and emotional consequences. Since the 1980s, the percentage of American adults who say they’re lonely has doubled from 20 percent to 40 percent.

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