“Is My Child Next?” – How raising black kids is affecting our mental health

This article originally appeared on Shondaland

"Is My Child Next?" The anxiety caused by raising children in a climate of escalating racial violence is real and is affecting your mental health.
“Is My Child Next?” The anxiety caused by raising children in a climate of escalating racial violence is real and is affecting your mental health. Photo by Thinking Good.
Feeling afraid is part and parcel of being a new mom. We’ve all laid awake at night pondering irrational questions like, Am I going to break this baby? How can I raise a tiny human when I still don’t have my own life really figured out? But soon after the birth of my now 16-year-old son, I became palpably aware of a different kind of fear, one that was heavy and poisonous at its core: I was now responsible for raising a black child and, in America, that means my kid is always in danger.

Any time that we can remind each other that these reactions are based in reality, that’s healing.

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Consciously Curated: Big Dreams, Pooh, Bullies and Serving Your Country

Consciously Curated is a roundup of news and information from other sources across the web to keep you thinking good:
A custom black notepad with ideas and fantasy photo
A custom black notepad with ideas and fantasy photo by Elijah O’Donell on Unsplash

Shondaland: Big dreams one line at a time

“The Magic Realism Bot offers its followers the opportunity to follow in these great writers’ footsteps by tweeting out three to six story ideas a day that encourage you to take a break and stretch your imagination. With its strange and thought-provoking prompts, it provides the ultimate daydream fodder for bookworms, fantasists, and writers alike — one tweet at a time.”

Continue reading “Consciously Curated: Big Dreams, Pooh, Bullies and Serving Your Country”

Dr. Jay Speights on Learning to Listen to Wisdom

How parents, grandparents and elders can be better teachers and leaders. Photo by London Scout – Courtesy of Unsplash

Here is an excerpt from our forthcoming Suite Talk podcast with Dr. Jay Speights. In this segment, we talk about why is it important to listen to the wisdom of our parents, grandparents and other elders, but also how they (and we) can be better teachers and leaders.

In the full-interview (look for it soon) we take a dive deeper in our earlier conversation on being the conductor of your own symphony. We’ll hear more from Dr. Speights on a range of topics, but for now lean in, lean back and enjoy!

Share what you’re thinking, leave a comment. Stay connected with the Thinking Good community.

Finding the Right Match: How to Determine the Best School for Your Child – A Conversation with Liz Yee, Lowell School Director of Admissions

Liz Yee, Director of Admissions Lowell School

In this episode of the Suite Talk podcast, we sit down with Liz Yee, Director of Admissions for Lowell School in Washington, DC. The 51-year-old independent school is committed to creating a community of lifelong learners who value and respect each other.

Our chat with Liz is designed to help you and your family navigate the school admissions and selections process, whether you are considering independent, parochial, public and charter schools, or all the above.

Full-disclosure, my oldest son has attended Lowell for three years, and my youngest will start in the Fall. And no, I’m not getting a discount on tuition for featuring Liz and Lowell on the Suite Talk podcast.

Our goal is offer you and your family expert insights and practical guidance you can use to make the best possible choice for your child’s education. No matter if your child, grandchild, niece or nephew is in preschool, primary, middle, high or entering college, this episode will help inform your decision-making process.

Some of the topics we explore are:

  • The importance of understanding your family values as they relate to your child’s educational environment.
  • How the story of Stone Soup applies to financial aid (and many other facets of life).
  • Why you should always keep you options open and it never hurts to ask.

Be on the lookout for future conversations with Liz, exploring other aspects of the school admissions process. But for now, lean-in, lean back and enjoy!

Share what you’re thinking, leave a comment. Stay connected with the Thinking Good community.

Consciously Curated: New Ideas for the New Year, Setting Your Kids Up for Success and Giving Your Kid Pot

Here is a roundup of news and information from other sources across the web to help you keep thinking good:

Technology Reviews: How Do People Get New Ideas

“A person willing to fly in the face of reason, authority, and common sense must be a person of considerable self-assurance. Since he occurs only rarely, he must seem eccentric (in at least that respect) to the rest of us. A person eccentric in one respect is often eccentric in others. Consequently, the person who is most likely to get new ideas is a person of good background in the field of interest and one who is unconventional in his habits. (To be a crackpot is not, however, enough in itself.)”

Continue reading “Consciously Curated: New Ideas for the New Year, Setting Your Kids Up for Success and Giving Your Kid Pot”