Consciously Curated: Professional Parenting for a Good Life and Love

Consciously Curated is a roundup of news and information from other sources across the web to keep you thinking good:
"Hold my hand," a photo by Sabine van Straaten on Unsplash
“Hold my hand,” a photo by Sabine van Straaten on Unsplash

The Upshot: The Jobs You’re Most Likely to Inherit From Your Mother and Father

“Children often pursue their parents’ jobs because of the breakfast-table effect: Family conversations influence them. They fuel interests or teach children what less commonly understood careers entail (probably one reason textile spinning and shoemaking are high on the list of jobs disproportionately passed on to children). In interviews, people who followed their parents’ career paths described it as speaking the same language.”

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Consciously Curated: Happy, Gifted, Bad and Sad

Consciously Curated is a roundup of news and information from other sources across the web to keep you thinking good:
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Huffington Post: Black and Blue

“There is an economic disadvantage for Blacks that is built into the fabric of American society. We don’t need to beat ourselves up in a desire to keep with “the Joneses”. This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t strive for excellence in every realm, but it does mean that killing yourself to try to keep up with images that may or may not be real will only lead to a life of frustration.”

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Consciously Curated: On Game Theory, Toxic People, Writing Better and Yelling

Consciously Curated is a roundup of inspiring and empowering news and information from across the web to keep you thinking good and your better self:

Click and Boo

Wired: Games Parents Play
Kids are master manipulators. They play up their charms, pit adults against one another, and engage in loud, public wailing. So it’s your job to keep up with them, Carnegie Mellon’s Kevin Zollman says. His new book, The Game Theorist’s Guide to Parenting—written with journalist Paul Raeburn—explains how.

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Consciously Curated: Engineering Inspiration, Growth, Failure and Understanding

“My Life Through A Lens”
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NYT: Creativity on a Schedule

I once heard a story about a guy who wanted to write a book. But he was too overwhelmed by the enormity of the process, so for a decade, he didn’t do it. One day, he decided to create a 5,000-word monthly magazine and offer a two-year subscription to everyone he knew. A bunch of people signed up, and all of a sudden, he had to do it. At the end of two years, he had 120,000 words to work with to create this book.

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Consciously Curated: Get Out of Your Cubicle, Connect and Play

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National Geographic: Play Games to Change the World
“We saw it this summer with Pokémon Go, this international obsession that was completely frivolous and pointless. You’re running around capturing imaginary monsters on your smart phone in the real world. What that game was doing was overlaying a virtual experience—information—over real-world environments. That’s what we call augmented reality: the idea that we are going to be walking around the world in actual physical space but have extra information overlaid in that world, telling us more serious things. Not, hey, there’s an imaginary monster over there, but, hey, your friend is around the corner or this is the best way to walk across the street. We’ll look back in ten years as those things become more prevalent in everyday experiences and say, hey, this all started with a game.”

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Consciously Curated: How to … Be a creep, despot or troll

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The Expressive Egg: How To Be Creepy
Stare. Nothing says ‘creepy’ so much as a dry, fixed, glittering, inflexible eyeball. Set your face into a single expression, or one of a limited range, for long enough and the lines of your face will radiate the unsettling, the uncanny and the existentially repellent. ‘The inexpressive face is the mirror of a shallow soul.’ The cruder, less expressive, less nuanced the muscles of your face (particularly around the eyes), the more your face will take on the look of that creepiest of objects, the mask.”

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Consciously Curated: Paycheck Slavery, What Aren’t You Asking, Jim Crow Rising, Defining Dystopia, Unhappy Endings

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Medium: 9 to 5 Slavery
“They never pay the slaves enough so they can get free, just enough so they can stay alive and come back to work. I could see all this. Why couldn’t they? I figured the park bench was just as good or being a barfly was just as good. Why not get there first before they put me there? Why wait?”

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Consciously Curated: Be Happy, Learn Truth, Swinging Left or Alt-Right, Trump Knows You Better & Understanding Buffett

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BBC: The Keys to Living A Meaningful Life
You are especially likely to be happier if your personal projects feel attainable. In fact, [Brian] Little has found that our confidence in achieving our projects is an even more important factor for our wellbeing than how much meaning a project has. Put differently, there are few things worse than having a core personal project that feels unobtainable. In fact, findings show that when someone is engaged in a personal project that makes them stressed and miserable, this is an even more powerful drag on their wellbeing than other more obvious factors like poverty. The perfect combination is to have one or more sustainable core projects that feel within reach and are also full of personal meaning, reflecting what matters to you in life.

Related – Brian Little: Who are you, really? The puzzle of personality

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Consciously Curated: New Ideas for the New Year, Setting Your Kids Up for Success and Giving Your Kid Pot

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Technology Reviews: How Do People Get New Ideas

“A person willing to fly in the face of reason, authority, and common sense must be a person of considerable self-assurance. Since he occurs only rarely, he must seem eccentric (in at least that respect) to the rest of us. A person eccentric in one respect is often eccentric in others. Consequently, the person who is most likely to get new ideas is a person of good background in the field of interest and one who is unconventional in his habits. (To be a crackpot is not, however, enough in itself.)”

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Consciously Curated: Dying Alone, What Parents Read, Careless Whispers, Coming Back and Funky Grandma

Photo by Pedro Lastra

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NY Times: Social Isolation is Killing Us

Social isolation is a growing epidemic — one that’s increasingly recognized as having dire physical, mental and emotional consequences. Since the 1980s, the percentage of American adults who say they’re lonely has doubled from 20 percent to 40 percent.

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