Consciously Curated: Be Happy, Learn Truth, Swinging Left or Alt-Right, Trump Knows You Better & Understanding Buffett

Photo by Jerry Kiesewetter – Courtesy of Unsplash

Here is a roundup of news and information from other sources across the web to help you keep thinking good:

BBC: The Keys to Living A Meaningful Life
You are especially likely to be happier if your personal projects feel attainable. In fact, [Brian] Little has found that our confidence in achieving our projects is an even more important factor for our wellbeing than how much meaning a project has. Put differently, there are few things worse than having a core personal project that feels unobtainable. In fact, findings show that when someone is engaged in a personal project that makes them stressed and miserable, this is an even more powerful drag on their wellbeing than other more obvious factors like poverty. The perfect combination is to have one or more sustainable core projects that feel within reach and are also full of personal meaning, reflecting what matters to you in life.

Related – Brian Little: Who are you, really? The puzzle of personality

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Consciously Curated: Sharpening Focus, The World is Watching, Trumpland

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Here is a roundup of news and information from other sources across the web to help you keep thinking good:

The Art of Manliness: 11 Ways to Strengthen Your Attention
“Try to attend steadfastly to a dot on the paper or on the wall. You presently find that one or the other of two things has happened: either your field of vision has become blurred, so that you now see nothing distinct at all, or else you have involuntarily ceased to look at the dot in question, and are looking at something else. But, if you ask yourself successive questions about the dot,—how big it is, how far, of what shape, what shade of color, etc.; in other words, if you turn it over, if you think of it in various ways, and along with various kinds of associates,—you can keep your mind on it for a comparatively long time. This is what the genius does, in whose hands a given topic coruscates and grows.”

Mic: Music for Your Mind and More
“What we found was the more a child trained on an instrument,” Hudziak told the Washington Post, “it accelerated cortical organization in attention skill, anxiety management and emotional control.”

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Consciously Curated: Being Lucky, Building a Brand, Following Your Soul and Eating a Burger

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Here is a roundup of news and information from other sources across the web to help you keep thinking good:

The Atlantic: You’re Lucky More Than You Think
“My having cheated death does not make me an authority on luck. But it has motivated me to learn much more about the subject than I otherwise would have. In the process, I have discovered that chance plays a far larger role in life outcomes than most people realize. And yet, the luckiest among us appear especially unlikely to appreciate our good fortune.”

The New York Times: Stop and Acknowledge How Much Luck Has to Do With Your Success
“From Warren E. Buffett, who says he won the “Ovarian Lottery,” to the venture capitalist Fred Wilson, a lot of smart, industrious and hard-working people admit that luck played a role. Mr. Wilson writes that he wouldn’t suggest anyone take his career path: “It won’t work unless you get incredibly lucky.”

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Consciously Curated: New Ideas for the New Year, Setting Your Kids Up for Success and Giving Your Kid Pot

Here is a roundup of news and information from other sources across the web to help you keep thinking good:

Technology Reviews: How Do People Get New Ideas

“A person willing to fly in the face of reason, authority, and common sense must be a person of considerable self-assurance. Since he occurs only rarely, he must seem eccentric (in at least that respect) to the rest of us. A person eccentric in one respect is often eccentric in others. Consequently, the person who is most likely to get new ideas is a person of good background in the field of interest and one who is unconventional in his habits. (To be a crackpot is not, however, enough in itself.)”

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Consciously Curated: Dying Alone, What Parents Read, Careless Whispers, Coming Back and Funky Grandma

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Here is a roundup of news and information from other sources across the web to help you keep thinking good:

NY Times: Social Isolation is Killing Us

Social isolation is a growing epidemic — one that’s increasingly recognized as having dire physical, mental and emotional consequences. Since the 1980s, the percentage of American adults who say they’re lonely has doubled from 20 percent to 40 percent.

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Consciously Curated: Juggling Baby, Learning to Follow, Reading, Unjust, A Woman Disguised

Here is a roundup of news and information from other sources across the web to help you keep thinking good:

New York Post: A TV Power Couple Raises a Family

The first time Craig Melvin visited the small-town western Pennsylvania “homestead” of his future wife, Lindsay Czarniak, he was taken aback by her family’s Christmas Day tradition.

“At the end of the meal, they were like, ‘Oh, it’s time to sing ‘Happy Birthday,’ ” recalls Melvin, an MSNBC anchor who hosts “MSNBC Live” and co-hosts “Today” on Saturdays. “I thought it was a joke, but lo and behold, they went and got baby Jesus out of the manger and we sang ‘Happy Birthday.’ ”

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Consciously Curated: Down Low in the Country, Meeting Hell, Shoot ‘Em Up

 

Photo by Sofia Sforza

Here is a roundup of news and information from other sources across the web to help you keep thinking good:

NY Magazine: A Country Low Down

“If you, a straight guy from the country, once in a while have sex with other straight guys from the country, it doesn’t threaten your straight, rural identity as much as it would if instead you, for example, traveled to the nearest major metro area and tried to pick up dudes at a gay bar. You’re not the sort of man who would go to a gay bar — you’re not gay!”

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Suite Talk: Week in Review and 2017 Sneak Peak

Photo by Jason Rosewell

On this episode of Suite Talk, we try something new. While going live on Facebook, we also recorded the audio for this podcast. Listen and you’ll hear a recap of the previous week, a preview of the week ahead and tease some of what Thinking Good has planned for 2017.

Lean in, Lean back and enjoy!

Share what you’re thinking, leave a comment. Stay connected with the Thinking Good community.

Consciously Curated: Ghosting, Star Wars, Finding Love, Trump’s Original Smackdown

 

Here is a roundup of news and information from other sources across the web to help you keep thinking good:

New York Post: How to Ghost for Real

“After all this time,” Norihiro says, “I could certainly take back my old identity . . . But I don’t want my family to see me in this state. Look at me. I look like nothing. I am nothing. If I die tomorrow, I don’t want anyone to be able to recognize me.”

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Consciously Curated: Pause For Success; Slow Growth; Forgetting …

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Here is a roundup of news and information from other sources across the web to help you keep thinking good:

NY Times: Let’s Chill

“Working in 90-minute intervals turns out to be a prescription for maximizing productivity. Professor K. Anders Ericsson and his colleagues at Florida State University have studied elite performers, including musicians, athletes, actors and chess players. In each of these fields, Dr. Ericsson found that the best performers typically practice in uninterrupted sessions that last no more than 90 minutes. They begin in the morning, take a break between sessions, and rarely work for more than four and a half hours in any given day.”

Thinking Good: Conduct Your Own Symphony

Dr. Speights gives us some practical insights on how to begin each day with purpose and focus, with an eye to setting the tone, tenor and tempo.”

YouTube: Can You Figure Out the Mystery Inside This Ad About High School Love?

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