Consciously Curated: Black History Month, Black Panther and The Importance of Black Fatherhood

Consciously Curated is a roundup of news and information from other sources across the web to keep you thinking good:

The Importance of History
James Motter

Chicago Tribune: Why parents need to talk to their kids, and celebrate, Black History Month

In the past, Black History Month has existed to remind us of the greatness we didn’t know we possessed. But in the era of #Blackgirlmagic and #Blackexcellence twitter trends, we see it. Black History Month is worth honoring and celebrating, but black people have expanded beyond our 28-day celebration, and we’re ready to pass the gift on.

In 2018, I believe Black History Month has an altered purpose. In addition to showing the persistence of black Americans, it provides an opportunity for white parents to educate their children not only about the contributions made by black Americans, but also to give them an insight to the circumstances that led to its creation.

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The Beauty of the Butterfly

“We delight in the beauty of the butterfly, but rarely admit the changes it has gone through to achieve that beauty,” #mayaangelou I’m in the middle of a writing project which is forcing me to think 🤔 deeply of the many bends of the river of my life, the high-water and low-water marks. No matter what, if I’ve experienced #success or suffered #failure having the willingness and ability to #change has been fundamental. I took this photo on a trip with @ashlib1 and #ThemPalmerBoys to visit with family. @thinkinggood4u was barely a notion at the time. Getting it to where is now has been a lot of #hardwork #patience #mental and #emotional fortitude. Even more will be required as we continue to grow. #fatherhood #father #parenting #fitfam #butterfly #entrepreneur #smallbusiness #motivation #inspiration #BeYourBetterSelf

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Interested in more inspiring and empowering stories? Check out these articles:
Playtime isn’t Only for Kids, Creativity still Blooms in Adult Life
Consciously Curated: Get Out of Your Cubicle, Connect and Play
No time to exercise? This is a must read!
Share what you’re thinking, leave a comment. Stay connected with the Thinking Good community.

The reason I started Thinking Good

The reason I started Thinking Good … Well as I endeavor to be the best I can be for my family and myself, I have found a dearth of quality information and resources dedicated to helping men work through the challenges we encounter as 21st Century husbands and fathers.

That’s why I founded Thinking Good, a media and lifestyle community, that helps men be their better selves. Our mission is to empower us to be better husbands, fathers, sons, brothers, friends, entrepreneurs, innovators, artists and thinkers. Not just for ourselves, but also our families and communities.

Want to learn more about Thinking Good? Check out these posts:
Welcome to Thinking Good!
Thinking Good’s Toolkit
Pieces Of Me: A (Selected) Autobiography of John Jioni Palmer
Roots Rock Reggae for the Thinking Man
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Spanking Children: What do we really learn from Corporal Punishment

To read the full article Click Here to download Thinking Good’s Toolkit for this and other exclusive content.
sad mad little girl
Sad Little Girl

In some of our communities, beating children is a cultural thing, as common and natural as sweet potato pie. We brag about it. We joke about it.  We gather at family events telling war stories about past whuppings – one-upping each other with tales of more brutal and inventive episodes of corporal punishment.

Invariably an older adult in the neighboring room — clearly not minding their own business — will interject: “Well, you all turned out alright, didn’t you?”

This generally spurs the most awkward three seconds of any family gathering, as jocular young’uns ask themselves a simple question: Did I?

Having engaged in several versions of this conversation, I am fascinated by the idea that this question requires examination. Did we turn out okay because we were spanked? And will the generation of children we are raising?

To read the full article Click Here to download Thinking Good’s Toolkit for this and other exclusive content.

A Hidden Army of Male Family Caregivers Rises to the Occasion

To read the full article Click Here to download Thinking Good’s Toolkit for this and other exclusive content.
Caregiving
Father and son sharing a laugh together.

In the early 2000s, when Bobby Edwards was living just outside Boston, he knew that, as the middle child between his older brother and younger sister, that one day he’d have to pitch in to help care for his aging parents in Washington, DC.

At times, caregiving for an elderly parent or loved one might start out with a little help with bills or grocery shopping. But for others, like Edwards, 56, it can be overwhelming.

In 1995, he lost his sister, Yvette, 30, who contracted AIDS from a boyfriend. Tragedy came again in 2006 when his older brother, Kenny, 50, died of a heart attack in their parents’ home. That’s when Edwards moved from Boston back home to Washington.

“When you grow up the middle of three children, you just don’t anticipate the experiences I’ve had to go through the last five years or so, caregiving for the two of them” by himself, Edwards said. With siblings, he said, “You  just assume, ‘We’ll share this. We’ll do this together.’ That wasn’t the case.”

Edwards isn’t alone. A recent report by AARP, “Breaking Stereotypes: Spotlight on Male Family Caregivers,” found that 40 percent of caregivers for aging adults are men. This represents some 16 million male caregivers nationwide.

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The building blocks of me

The Building Block of me
Photo by Element5 Digital on Unsplash

I was five or six and recall being in a laundromat, but mom believes it was at a grocery store. The alleged transgression is forgotten by us both, but each remembers her towering over me index finger wagging demanding, “Who do you think you are?” I replied, “John Jioni Palmer.”

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Planting Seeds

Dr. Jay Speights, Vice President of the New Seminary and author of 7 Days with Adam

Check out the inaugural episode of SEEDS, a  podcast by frequent Thinking Good contributor Rev. Dr. Jay Speights. SEEDS is a podcast offering inspiration for spiritual growth, stepping into your higher self and maintaining balance in this fast-paced, digitized noise-polluted 21st Century World. Dr. Jay wants you to join him in taking a quantum leap into the mystery of creation through deep reflection and introspection.

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